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Stena AB repays huge bond loans

Carriers:

Major and wealthy Swedish shipping group Stena AB is, unlike several of its Nordic peers which are currently wrestling with their bondholders, able to repay two large bond loans for a total EUR 600 million, which are set to mature on Feb. 1 this year.


BY LOUISE VOGDRUP-SCHMIDT
Published 10.01.17 at 13:53

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