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Port chief sees US import surge "easily" lasting into 2022

The record-high volumes hitting US container ports will most likely last well into 2022, as companies are rushing to replenish their stockpiles following an uneven rebound from the pandemic.

Container vessels in line off the US west coast earlier this year | Photo: Mike Blake/Reuters/Ritzau Scanpix

The head of one of the largest US gateways for trade said robust demand for imported goods will likely be sustained into 2022, as companies scramble to rebuild stockpiles during an uneven rebound from the pandemic.

"We easily see this going through up to Chinese New Year, and there's a lot of indications now that it could go beyond that," said Griff Lynch, executive director of the Georgia Ports Authority, referring to the holiday in the first quarter of year that typically is preceded by a rush for ocean shipping. "We talk to our customers every day -- they're telling us they still have low inventory."

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