ShippingWatch

Electrolux: Hanjin collapse could impact production

One of the world's biggest shippers, Sweden's Electrolux, is struggling to reload and secure the 600 Hanjin containers which are either on one of the vessels from the collapsed Korean carrier or stranded at a port somewhere. Production could take a hit, Electrolux tells ShippingWatch.

Photo: PR-foto/Hanjin Shipping

Swedish Electrolux has made it relatively unscathed through the first dramatic days following Hanjin Shipping's court receivership last week. With about five percent of its global freight on the carrier's vessels, things could have been much worse for the manufacturer of major appliances, explains Vice President of Global Logistics at Electrolux, Bjørn Vang Jensen. But on the other hand, 600 Hanjin containers are currently located somewhere at sea on one of the carrier's vessels or stranded at one of the world's many ports.

As such, the collapse of the struggling carrier could undoubtedly become a big problem for Electrolux. In part for the company itself, which uses containers to send parts for products to be assembled at factories, where work risks coming to a stop because the components might never arrive. And in part for the customers, who are waiting for finished products which should be in stores and in stock.

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