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Alphaliner doubts China as growth engine

The weaker industriel activity directed toward the Far East, and thus the Chinese demand that has been a driving force behind the global demand for two decades, marks a structural change for the container industry.

Photo: Jan Grarup

The lower growth of the global economy in 2013 could have significant consequences for the container industry and will mark a "structural change" in the global demand in the container freight industry. This is primarily due to the weaker industrial activity directed toward the Far East, and thus the Chinese demand that has been a driving force behind the global demand for two decades, writes Alphaliner.

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) recently downgraded its expectations for the global economy in 2013 due to tighter public budgets, which dampens growth in the United States while keeping the EU in recession. The IMF's most recent World Economic Outlook (WEO) in April lowered the growth of the global GDP from 3.5 percent to 3.3 percent, though the IMF maintains its GDP growth expectations for 2014, at 4.0 percent.

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